The term “clean eating” perhaps implies that other foods are “dirty,” but in reality, that’s not the case. To us, “clean eating” means filling your plate with nutritious whole foods like whole grains, fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, healthy fats and legumes—all of which deliver important nutrients, like fiber—while keeping things like added sugars, sodium and saturated fats to a minimum, nutrients that can harm our health when we eat too much.


The goal is to help you feel your best, and sometimes you need a kick to get started. If you’re new to cooking or just feeling swamped right now, this easy-to-follow meal plan is for you. We focus on simple recipes with short ingredient lists, incorporate plenty of pantry staples and repeat meals throughout the week to streamline your time in the kitchen.


Whether you make one recipe or a few, this meal plan is meant to provide inspiration and motivation—it is not meant to be binding. Listen to your hunger and fullness cues rather than sticking to a specific calorie count or serving size, and don’t totally ignore your cravings! It’s completely OK and healthy to enjoy a sweet treat or glass of wine here and there, and not restricting these things can actually make it easier to maintain a healthy lifestyle in the long run.


See More: The “Dirty Dozen” and “Clean Fifteen”—Here’s What Experts Have to Say About Choosing Organic



What Is a Clean-Eating Meal Plan?

A clean-eating meal plan includes tons of fresh fruits and veggies, high-fiber whole grains and legumes, healthy fats and lean proteins (like fish and chicken). It skips added sugars and minimizes sodium and saturated fats that can damage our hearts when we eat too much of them. While we are certainly not against sweets, according to the American Heart Association, the average American consumes way more added sugar than the recommended upper limit of 6 teaspoons a day for women and 9 for men. Often, a lot of the added sugar we consume comes from non-dessert foods, like cereals and bars. While we left these foods out of this plan, you can certainly add them back in where you see fit.


This plan will leave you feeling satisfied because it includes plenty of nutrients that keep us full, like fiber (from fruits, vegetables and legumes), lean proteins (from Greek yogurt, fish and chicken) and healthy fats (from nuts and avocado). Regular meals and snacks from nutritious sources, plenty of water to help you stay hydrated and moderate exercise throughout the week means more lasting energy.




If you’re following this clean-eating meal plan for weight loss, we set the calorie level at 1,500 per day, which is a level where most people lose weight, plus included modifications for 1,200 and 2,000 calories a day, depending on your calorie needs.



What to Eat on a Clean-Eating Diet

  • Vegetables: The more, the better, especially when it comes to leafy greens. Plain frozen vegetables are a great option too.
  • Fruit: Opt for fresh or plain frozen fruit. If looking at canned fruit, opt for options canned in water or fruit juice instead of sugary syrup. Drain and rinse fruit canned in syrup.
  • Whole Grains: Oats, whole-wheat bread, barley and quinoa are great options.
  • Nuts and Seeds: Choose plain, raw, roasted or salted nuts but skip most other flavors (like honey) as they contain added sugars. When choosing peanut butter, opt for brands with just two ingredients: peanuts and salt.
  • Healthy Fats: Fatty fish, like salmon, as well as olive oil, canola and avocado, are great healthy fat options.
  • Legumes: Beans and lentils are high in fiber and protein, plus the canned options are convenient pantry staples.
  • Lean Proteins: When choosing proteins, opt for more chicken, turkey, fish, low-fat Greek yogurt and legumes.



How to Meal-Prep Your Week of Meals:

A little prep at the beginning of the week goes a long way to make the rest of the week easy.


  1. Make Vegan Superfood Grain Bowls to have for lunch on Days 2 through 5.
  2. Prepare Citrus Vinaigrette to have with dinner throughout the week.



Day 1

Breakfast (490 calories)

  • 1 cup low-fat plain Greek yogurt (179 calories)
  • 1/4 cup raspberries (19 calories)
  • 3 Tbsp. chopped walnuts (292 calories)


A.M. Snack (77 calories)



Lunch (360 calories)



P.M. Snack (350 calories)

  • 1 large apple (148 calories)
  • 2 Tbsp. natural peanut butter (202 calories)


Dinner (422 calories)



Meal-Prep Tip: Gather ingredients for tomorrow’s dinner, Slow-Cooker Vegetable Minestrone Soup, so it’s ready to start cooking on Low tomorrow morning for 6 to 8 hours.


Daily Totals: 1,699 calories, 84 g protein, 142 g carbohydrates, 34 g fiber, 94 g fat, 1,141 mg sodium


To Make It 1,200 Calories: Reduce to 1 tablespoon of walnuts at breakfast and reduce to half an apple at P.M. snack, along with omitting the peanut butter.


To Make It 2,000 Calories: Increase to 1 1/2 cups yogurt at breakfast and add 1/3 cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds to A.M. snack.



Day 2

Breakfast (324 calories)



A.M. Snack (214 calories)

  • 1/4 cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds


Lunch (381 calories)



P.M. Snack (37 calories)

  • 1 medium bell pepper, sliced


Dinner (485 calories)



Meal-Prep Tip: Reserve leftover Slow-Cooker Vegetable Minestrone Soup to have for dinner tomorrow night.


Daily Totals: 1,441 calories, 55 g protein, 154 g carbohydrates, 42 g fiber, 76 g fat, 1,135 mg sodium


To Make It 1,200 Calories: Change the A.M. snack to 1/3 cup sliced cucumber.


To Make It 2,000 Calories: Add 1 slice of whole-wheat toast with 1 tablespoon natural peanut butter to breakfast, increase to 1/3 cup almonds at A.M. snack, add 1/4 cup hummus to P.M. snack and increase to 1 whole avocado at dinner.



Day 3

Breakfast (491 calories)

  • 1 cup low-fat plain Greek yogurt (179 calories)
  • 1/4 cup raspberries (20 calories)
  • 3 Tbsp. chopped walnuts (292 calories)


A.M. Snack (214 calories)

  • 1/4 cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds


Lunch (381 calories)



P.M. Snack (77 calories)



Dinner (485 calories)



Daily Totals: 1,648 calories, 70 g protein, 150 g carbohydrates, 45 g fiber, 87 g fat, 1,003 mg sodium


To Make It 1,200 Calories: Reduce to 2 tablespoons of chopped walnuts at breakfast, change the A.M. snack to 1/3 cup sliced cucumber and reduce to 1/4 avocado at dinner.


To Make It 2,000 Calories: Increase to 4 tablespoons chopped walnuts at breakfast and 1/3 cup almonds at A.M. snack, add 1/3 cup dried walnut halves to P.M. snack and increase to 1 whole avocado at dinner.



Day 4

Breakfast (324 calories)



A.M. Snack (183 calories)

  • 1 medium bell pepper, sliced
  • 1/4 cup hummus


Lunch (381 calories)



P.M. Snack (214 calories)

  • 1/4 cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds


Dinner (493 calories)



Daily Totals: 1,595 calories, 92 g protein, 130 g carbohydrates, 34 g fiber, 86 g fat, 1,438 mg sodium


To Make It 1,200 Calories: Omit the hummus at the A.M. snack and change the P.M. snack to 1 clementine.


To Make It 2,000 Calories: Add 1 slice of whole-wheat toast with 1 tablespoon natural peanut butter to breakfast, increase to 1/3 cup almonds and add 1 clementine to P.M. snack, and add 1/2 cup cooked quinoa to dinner.



Day 5

Breakfast (491 calories)

  • 1 cup low-fat plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/4 cup raspberries
  • 3 Tbsp. chopped walnuts


A.M. Snack (324 calories)

  • 1 medium apple
  • 2 Tbsp. natural peanut butter


Lunch (381 calories)



P.M. Snack (77 calories)



Dinner (414 calories)



Meal-Prep Tip: Reserve two servings of Chicken & Kale Soup to have for lunch on Days 6 and 7.


Daily Totals: 1,687 calories, 84 g protein, 162 g carbohydrates, 36 g fiber, 89 g fat, 1,139 mg sodium


To Make It 1,200 Calories: Reduce the walnuts to 1 tablespoon at breakfast and omit the peanut butter at the A.M. snack.


To Make It 2,000 Calories: Add 1/4 cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds to P.M. snack and 1/2 avocado to dinner.



Day 6

Breakfast (324 calories)



A.M. Snack (324 calories)

  • 1 medium apple (122 calories)
  • 2 Tbsp. natural peanut butter (202 calories)


Lunch (393 calories)



P.M. Snack (152 calories)

  • 1/3 cup cucumber, sliced (6 calories)
  • 1/4 cup hummus (146 calories)


Dinner (399 calories)



Daily Totals: 1,592 calories, 67 g protein, 185 g carbohydrates, 32 g fiber, 68 g fat, 1,581 mg sodium


To Make It 1,200 Calories: Omit the peanut butter at the A.M. snack and omit the hummus at the P.M. snack.


To Make It 2,000 Calories: Add 1 slice of whole-wheat toast with 1 tablespoon natural peanut butter to breakfast, add 1 orange to P.M. snack and add 1/2 serving Guacamole Chopped Salad to dinner.



Day 7

Breakfast (324 calories)



A.M. Snack (214 calories)

  • 1/4 cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds


Lunch (393 calories)



P.M. Snack (183 calories)

  • 1 medium bell pepper
  • 1/4 cup hummus


Dinner (466 calories)



Daily Totals: 1,580 calories, 73 g protein, 177 g carbohydrates, 36 g fiber, 69 g fat, 1,506 mg sodium


To Make It 1,200 Calories: Change the A.M. snack to 1 clementine and omit the hummus at the P.M. snack.


To Make It 2,000 Calories: Add 1 slice of whole-wheat toast with 1 tablespoon natural peanut butter to breakfast, increase to 1/3 cup almonds at A.M. snack and add 1 serving Everything Bagel Avocado Toast to dinner.